Chine et humanités numériques

Le blog du China Policy Institute de l’université de Nottingham publie, depuis le début du mois de juin 2016, une série de billets sur les humanités numériques appliquées aux études sur la Chine et en Chine. L’un des billets est dû à Hilde De Weerdt, qui a présenté en mai dernier au CECMC son projet Communication and Empire: Chinese Empires in Comparative Perspective et les outils collaboratifs associés.

Schneider, Florian. Studying Digital China’s Networks and Media Objects. June 3, 2016. URL : http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/03/studying-digital-chinas-networks-and-media-objects-the-promises-and-challenges-of-digital-data/

Digital technologies are visibly ‘disrupting’ how our societies work (Owen 2015), and this also has profound implications for those of us studying Asia. Digital tools make it possible to assess vast amounts of data, systematically explore their patterns, and visualize the results in compelling new ways. Indeed, for the case of China, digital methods have been deployed to study a wide range of intriguing issues: how censorship works (King et al. 2013), how public opinion and belief systems are polarized online (Wu 2014), what exchanges on Sina Weibo might tell us about specific social phenomena like suicide (Fu et al. 2013), and – in my own work – what the structures of China’s internet reveal about ‘Sino-phone’ web spheres and internet governance (Schneider 2015a, 2015b).

Lire la suite

Tom Mullaney. Digital Humanities Q and A with Thomas S. Mullaney. June 6, 2016. http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/06/digital-humanities-qa-with-tom-mullaney/

The ‘Digital Humanities’ is a young and highly contested area. How do you personally define the field?

Over the past decade, a powerful new suite of spatial, textual, and social network analysis tools – broadly understood as the Digital Humanities – has begun to expand the methods that we as Humanists and Social Scientists bring to bear on our questions, and indeed the very questions we ask. Looking out over the terrain of Digital Humanities (DH) initiatives, the vista is an impressive and dynamically changing one. At Stanford University alone, one can point to award-winning programs such as the Mapping the Republic of Letters project, myriad initiatives based at the Stanford Literary Lab, the Kindred Britain project, and the ORBIS Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World, to cite only a handful of examples. When we extend our view across the United States and worldwide, the roster of DH initiatives becomes ever more compelling and exciting.

Lire la suite

Vierthaler, Paul. Imperial Chinese Studies and Trends in the Digital Humanities. June 7, 2016. URL : http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/07/imperial-chinese-studies-and-trends-in-the-digital-humanities/

The digital humanities (DH) encompass a variety of methodological innovations that have become increasingly popular among humanists. Although DH is proving quite effective as a means of studying human culture, scholars of imperial Chinese studies in the western academy are still coming to grips with what mass digitization and the prospect of quantitative analysis means for the field at large.

Lire la suite

Sturgeon, Donald. Crowdsourcing, APIs, and a Digital Library of Chinese. June 8, 2016. URL : http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/08/crowdsourcing-apis-and-a-digital-library-of-chinese/

Digital methods have revolutionized many aspects of the study of pre-modern Chinese literature, from the simple but transformative ability to perform full-text searches and automated concordancing, through to the application of sophisticated statistical techniques that would be entirely impractical without the aid of a computer. While the methods themselves have evolved significantly – and continue to do so – one of the most fundamental prerequisites to almost all digital studies of Chinese literature remains access to reliable digital editions of the texts themselves.

Lire la suite

Hilde De Weerdt. Collaborative Innovation and the Chinese (Digital) Humanities. June 9, 2016. URL : http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/09/collaborative-innovation-and-the-chinese-digital-humanities/

The datafication of everything we do while we are online, carry our phones, fill out forms, make payments, or simply pass by traffic or security cameras is reshaping how governments and businesses make decisions and how all aspects of our lives including health care, education, sports, and housing are organized. These changes did not come about as a result of digitization or the mere conversion of analogue information into binary code. They are now becoming visible and debatable as the outcome of new uses of, often individually generated and personal, data gathered by different organizations and of new ways of combining and analyzing such data.

Lire la suite

Lik Hang Tsui. The Digital Humanities as an Emerging Field in China. June 13, 2016. URL : http://blogs.nottingham.ac.uk/chinapolicyinstitute/2016/06/13/the-digital-humanities-as-an-emerging-field-in-china/

The “digital humanities” (usually translated as shuzi renwen 数字人文 in mainland China and shuwei renwen 數位人文 in Taiwan) have recently received a lot of attention in Chinese academic circles, even though it took a long time for the concept to come to the attention of mainland China universities. The first digital humanities centre in China was established by Wuhan University in 2011. It remains the only mainland Chinese member of centerNet, an international network of digital humanities research centres.

Lire la suite


Monique Abud

Centre d'études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine, EHESS, Paris, France

More Posts

Monique Abud

Centre d'études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine, EHESS, Paris, France

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *